A-train: memoirs of a Tuskegee Airman by Charles W. Dryden

By Charles W. Dryden

A-Train is the tale of 1 of the black american citizens who, in the course of global struggle II, graduated from Tuskegee (AL) Flying tuition and served as a pilot within the military Air Corps’ 99th Pursuit Squadron. Charles W. Dryden offers a fast paced, balanced, and private account of what it was once prefer to organize for a occupation usually closed to African american citizens, how he coped with the frustrations and risks of strive against, and the way he, besides many fellow black pilots, navigators, bombardiers, and crewmen, emerged with a powerful warfare list. below the command of Colonel Benjamin O. Davis Jr., the Tuskegee airmen fought over North Africa, Sicily, and Europe, escorting American bomber crews who revered their "no-losses" checklist. a few have been shot down, a lot of them have been killed or captured via the enemy, and several other received medals of valor and honor. however the airmen nonetheless confronted nice boundaries of racial prejudice within the militia and at domestic. As a member of that elite crew of younger pilots who fought for his or her state out of the country whereas being denied civil liberties at domestic, Dryden provides an eloquent tale that would contact each reader. 

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A-train: memoirs of a Tuskegee Airman

A-Train is the tale of 1 of the black american citizens who, in the course of international warfare II, graduated from Tuskegee (AL) Flying institution and served as a pilot within the military Air Corps’ 99th Pursuit Squadron. Charles W. Dryden provides a fast moving, balanced, and private account of what it was once prefer to organize for a profession characteristically closed to African americans, how he coped with the frustrations and hazards of wrestle, and the way he, besides many fellow black pilots, navigators, bombardiers, and crewmen, emerged with an impressive warfare list.

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In all my five years, until then, I had never heard "the" word, the hated word, the hateful word. It was never used in our household. " "Oh? " And I sang the ditty. Dead silence, for just a moment, Mom and Dad looking at me with strange expressions on their faces. Anger? Disbelief? Shock? I saw all of these but most of all, ANGER! Breathing hard, speaking in a tone I had never heard before, Dad said: "Son, I am not angry with you, but don't you ever sing that song again. Nigger is a bad word and we never use it.

Did I know this? Yes, I had read it in an Army Air Corps flying safety bulletin. Then why buzz? Why defy the rules? Why risk the loss of my flying career? ("A fate worse than death," I thought. ") The questions flashed through my mind and, as many persons facing death have testified, my whole life passed in review, as if to provide answers. Page 7 3 The Fledgling � 19201941 "Air'pwane! " That is what "Sister Vie" used to tell me about my early yearning for the sky. To me she was "Mom," the gentlest, most devout, loving mother anywhere, ever.

Well," he said triumphantly, "you can't enlist. " And he threw the application back across the desk to me. " Twenty-two hours later, on Tuesday, I was right back at the recruiting office with the application signed on the proper line by my Dad in his beautiful handwriting. Holding the form gingerly, as though it was too hot to handle, Sergeant What's-his-name grunted: "You'll hear from us. Don't call us; we'll contact you when we're ready. " I couldn't help wondering if that was, indeed, all.

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